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The prospect of choosing the women to include in our decks was both daunting and incredibly exciting. We made the decision to select the women we thought would be the best match and then to sort out the various ranks later, according to each woman's own history. If you have any recommendations for future decks, please share them with us by email at info@thewomancards.com

The women included in the first edition of the deck are listed below. The second edition is listed further down.

FIRST EDITION

Ace: Hillary Clinton—The word "ace" denotes "one" or "single," which is why there is only one spot on the card. A former First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State, and the winner of the 2016 Presidential Popular Vote, Hillary Clinton is the first woman to have ever been nominated for President of the United States by a major American political party. 

King: Ruth Bader Ginsburg—Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was dubbed the "Notorious RBG" in 2014, an allusion to famed New York rapper "Notorious BIG," following her blistering dissent in the Shelby case. Since acquiring the nickname, she has often been depicted wearing the King's crown worn by the Notorious BIG on the cover of Rolling Stone.

Queen: Beyoncé—Need we say more?

Jack: Clara Barton—We know that “Jack of all trades” is a simplistic moniker, but Clara Barton really did do it all. Throughout her career, she worked as a school teacher, a patent clerk, a front lines nurse during the Civil War, a civil rights activist, a renowned suffragist, and an acclaimed lecturer. And then after all of that, she founded the American Red Cross.

10: Sylvia Rivera—In Sylvia's own words, "Ray Rivera left home at the age of 10 to become Sylvia. And that’s who I am." Sylvia then became a leading figure in what was then called the gay liberation movement, fighting to help protect young homeless drag queens and transgender women of color in New York City.  

9: Amelia Earhart—The legendary American aviator Amelia Earhart spent her career breaking and setting flight records. (And briefly served as the aviation editor of Cosmopolitan magazine!) She played an instrumental role in creating "The Ninety-Nines," a pioneering women's aviation association. 

8: Harriet Tubman—We've been hearing a lot about Harriet Tubman lately, who will soon be joining Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill. During the eight years Tubman served as a "conductor" on the Underground Railroad, guiding hundreds of slaves to freedom, she never lost even a single passenger.

7: Mary Cassatt—One of seven children, Mary Cassatt was the most famous American Impressionist painter and often featured young children as the subjects of her work. In Paris, she befriended the French painter Edgar Degas, who once depicted her holding a hand of playing cards.

6: Susan B. Anthony—Although most Americans know Susan B. Anthony best for her activism for women's suffrage, she was also an author and historian on the topic and played a key role in initiating the six-volume History of Woman Suffrage. The tome was finally completed in 1922, after the ratification of the 19th Amendment.

5: Wilma Rudolph—The odds of Wilma Rudolph becoming known as "the fastest woman in history" were long: she contracted the polio virus as a child and spent five long years wearing a leg brace on her left leg and foot. After regaining her ability to walk, and then run, Rudolph went on to become the first American woman to ever win three Track and Field gold medals in a single Olympic Games.

4: Rosa Parks—On December 1, 1955, a Montgomery bus driver ordered four black passengers to move further back on his bus to make room for white passengers to sit. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat despite the threat of arrest. Three days later, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began, a defining moment in the American Civil Rights Movement.

3: Ida B. Wells—In 1892, three friends of Ida B. Wells were seized and murdered by a lynch mob in Memphis, Tennessee. Wells launched a ground-breaking investigation into their deaths and spent two months traveling through the South investigating and writing about other lynchings, under near-constant threat of violence. She later became a founding member of the NAACP.

2: Dr. Sally Ride—In 1983, Dr. Sally Ride became the first American woman to enter space, she remains the youngest American to have ever done so, and is the first known LGBT astronaut. She made two journeys to space, both on board the space shuttle Challenger, founded NASA's Office of Exploration, and led NASA's first-ever long-term strategic planning process. In addition, her second mission was the first space mission ever to include two women.

Big Joker: Betty White—The so-called "Mayor of Hollywood" is widely regarded as a pioneering figure in American television and is recognized as the first woman to produce a sitcom. She currently holds the Guinness World Record for longest television career of a female entertainer. 

Small Joker: Ellen DeGeneres—One of America's first out LGBT entertainers, Ellen's career has spanned stand-up comedy, sitcoms, daytime talk shows, award show hosting, voice acting, writing, directing, and more. In 2015, her Oscar selfie with a lot of other famous people became the most retweeted tweet of all time.

(Note: "Big" Joker and "Small" Joker are designated as such for the purposes of some games that require a differentiation.)

SECOND EDITION

Ace: Hillary Clinton—The word "ace" denotes "one" or "single," which is why there is only one spot on the card. A former First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State, and the winner of the 2016 Presidential Popular Vote, Hillary Clinton is the first woman to have ever been nominated for President of the United States by a major American political party or to win the Presidential Popular Vote. 

King: Shirley Chisholm—An author, educator, relentless public servant, the first black woman elected to Congress, and the first black candidate for a major party's nomination for President of the United States, Shirley Chisholm got her start in politics representing King's County (Brooklyn) in the New York State Assembly.  

Queen: Eleanor Roosevelt—America's longest-serving First Lady was the final woman we cut from our first deck, and we were thrilled to include her in our second. Eleanor Roosevelt was a visionary of her time and a tireless advocate for women, African Americans, Asian Americans, and refugees of the second World War. She was also the first American delegate to the United Nations and oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Jack: Sacagawea—The renown guide, interpreter, and explorer Sacagawea joined Lewis and Clark on their Corps of Discovery Expedition. During their travels, she picked up the nickname "Janey," which reminded us of "Jack." (Anything to avoid "Jack-of-all-trades.") Her intimate knowledge of the terrain and ability as an interpreter were invaluable to the two-year Expedition. 

10: Sylvia Rivera—In Sylvia's own words, "Ray Rivera left home at the age of 10 to become Sylvia. And that’s who I am." Sylvia then became a leading figure in what was then called the gay liberation movement, fighting to help protect young homeless drag queens and transgender women of color in New York City.  

9. Patsy Mink—Representative Mink, a third generation Japanese American, was the first woman of non-European descent elected to the Congress and co-authored the Title IX Amendment of the Higher Education Act, also known today as the "Patsy Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act." Title IX was a critical step toward gender equality in the United States. 

8. Sojourner Truth—In 1828 Isabella Baumfree, later known as Sojourner Truth, became the first black woman in America to ever win a court case against a white man. She went on to become one of the nineteenth century's most prominent abolitionists, women's suffragists, and sought-after speakers. One of her most famous speeches was delivered for the "Commemoration of the Eighth Anniversary of Negro Freedom" in 1871, in which she publicly wrestled with the anger she felt toward the white people who had imprisoned her. 

7. Mary Cassatt—One of seven children, Mary Cassatt was the most famous American Impressionist painter and often featured young children as the subjects of her work. In Paris, she befriended the French painter Edgar Degas, who once depicted her holding a hand of playing cards.

6. Susan B. Anthony—Although most Americans know Susan B. Anthony best for her activism for women's suffrage, she was also an author and historian on the topic and played a key role in initiating the six-volume History of Woman Suffrage. The tome was finally completed in 1922, after the ratification of the 19th Amendment.

5. Wilma Rudolph—The odds of Wilma Rudolph becoming known as "the fastest woman in history" were long: she contracted the polio virus as a child and spent five long years wearing a leg brace on her left leg and foot. After regaining her ability to walk, and then run, Rudolph went on to become the first American woman to ever win three Track and Field gold medals in a single Olympic Games.

4. Rosa Parks—On December 1, 1955, a Montgomery bus driver ordered four black passengers to move further back on his bus to make room for white passengers to sit. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat despite the threat of arrest. Three days later, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began, a defining moment in the American Civil Rights Movement.

3. Gertrude Stein—One of America's most prominent literary figures, Gertrude Stein coined the phrase "Lost Generation" and hosted a prominent Parisian salon in the early 1900s. Her critically acclaimed book Three Lives, tells the story of three working women in Baltimore and established her as a preeminent American novelist of an incredibly era for American writing.

2. Cecilia Payne—In 1952, Cecilia Payne published a Ph.D. dissertation then-described as "undoubtedly the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy." Her work established hydrogen and helium, as the two most abundant elements in the universe, forever changing our understanding of astronomy, and blazed a trail for women into one of science's most male-dominated fields. She later became the first woman to ever head a department at Harvard College. 

Big Joker: Lucille Ball—Co-creator of the beloved sitcom I Love Lucy, Lucille Ball was not only a model, actress, and comedienne. She was the first woman in America to become a major television studio exeucitve, producing hits like Mission: Impossible and Stark Trek. (Both of these were television shows before they become blockbuster movies.) She was one of America's most loved and most decorated entertainers.

Small Joker: Phyllis Diller—She started out telling jokes to PTA moms and didn't get into professional comedy until she was almost 40, and then she took the country by storm, becoming America's first and foremost successful stand-up comedienne. She is widely seen as having paved the way for women comics including Joan Rivers, Ellen DeGeneres, Margaret Cho, and Rosanne Barr.

(Note: "Big" Joker and "Small" Joker are designated as such for the purposes of some games that require a differentiation.)